Henning Ryden was another early member of the P&C about whom little is known today at 1012 N. Dearborn. He showed in the 1898 Salon de Refuse. He was a painter as well as a sculptor. He designed a series of medals for the PGA Championship–at the top of this post is the medal won by Walter Hagen in 1927.

He also designed a series of medals for the 1893 Columbian Exhibition in Chicago that are pretty well known, as well as this Lincoln medallion:

The inscription on the reverse reads:

LINCOLN, CALLING FOR A PITCHER
OF WATER AND GLASSES, SAID
WE’LL DRINK TO THE FORTUNES
OF OUR PARTY IN THE BEST
BEVERAGE EVER BREWED FOR MAN

(I didn’t know Lincoln was a temperance man.)

Here’s one of Ryden’s watercolors and one of his oils.

You can find a brief bio of his life in The History of the Swedes in Illinois, by Ernst Olson:

Henning Ryden, born in Blekinge, Sweden, in 1869, the son of a schoolmaster, was thrown on his own resources early in life and learned the engraver’s art. At this he worked in Stockholm and Copenhagen, devoting his leisure moments to art studies. In 1891 he crossed the ocean, and at the World’s Fair in Chicago he had an exhibition of artistically engraved medals of the presidents of the United States. Finding little demand for this kind of work in this country, Ryden gradually turned his attention to sculpture, and later turned from sculpture to painting. Following the pursuit of art studies in Paris, Berlin and London, he located in Chicago and made a reputation as one of the most skillful medal engravers in the West. For a time he devoted himself to relief portraiture in plaques and bronzes, producing a number of excellent specimens of such work.

In late years hardly an exhibition has taken place in Chicago at which Ryden has not been represented with one or more paintings. At the exhibition of American painters at the Art Institute in 1901 three of Ryden ‘s pictures, “The Edge of the Woods”, “Autumn Tones”, and “The Close of Day”, were the objects of much favorable comment. The summer seasons the artist spends in Wisconsin, making sketches for canvases, which are later finished in time for the winter’s exhibitions.

Here is another medal he designed, for the Chicago Horticultural Society:

This one sits on my desk at work and from time to time I use it to hold down the pages of criminal trial transcripts I have to read. It makes a charming paperweight, and it reminds me that the P&C has a great history that began long before I arrived.

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